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Difference of early and modern chinese literary periods​

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  • Réponse publiée par: sherelyn0013

    answer:

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  • Réponse publiée par: pauyonlor

    Following the overthrow of the Qing dynasty and the establishment of the republic in 1911/12, many young intellectuals turned their attention to the overhauling of literary traditions, beginning with the language itself. In January 1917 an article by Hu Shih, a student of philosophy at Columbia University, entitled “Wenxue gailiang chuyi” (“Tentative Proposal for Literary Reform”) was published in Xinqingnian (New Youth), a radical monthly magazine published in Beijing. In it Hu called for a new national literature written not in the classical language but in the vernacular, the living “national language” (guoyu). Chen Duxiu, the editor of Xinqingnian, supported Hu’s views in his own article “Wenxue geming lun” (“On Literary Revolution”), which emboldened Hu to hone his arguments further in a second article (1918), “Jianshe de wenxue geming” (“Constructive Literary Revolution”), in which he spelled out his formula for a “literary renaissance.”

    Explanation:

    These early writings provided the impetus for a number of youthful intellectuals to pool their resources and promote shared ideals by forming literary associations. In 1920 Shen Yanbin, better known later as Mao Dun, and others established the Wenxue Yanjiuhui (“Literary Research Association”), generally referred to as the “realist” or “art-for-life’s-sake” school, which assumed the editorship of the established literary magazine Xiaoshuo yuebao (Short Story Monthly). Perhaps the most important literary magazine of the early 1920s, Xiaoshuo yuebao was used by the Association to promote the so-called “new literature,” most major fiction writers publishing their works in it throughout the 1920s, until the magazine’s headquarters was destroyed by Japanese bombs in 1932. The socially reflective, critical-realist writing that characterized this group held sway in China well into the 1940s, when it was gradually eclipsed by more didactic, propagandistic literature. Members of the smaller Chuangzao She (“Creation Society”), on the other hand, were followers of the “Romantic” tradition who eschewed any expressions of social responsibility by writers, referring to their work as “art for art’s sake.”

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Difference of early and modern chinese literary periods​...